Facts and myths about UQ

A total of 83 students were enrolled when teaching began at UQ in 1911. We have grown (slightly!) to now host more than 50,000 students across a range of around 420 programs. Over the years, the rumour mill has spun and myths have been circulated, so here we are to set the record straight about going to uni. If there is a particular myth that you would like busted leave us a note and we will get our team onto it. 

We want you to come to uni prepared and knowing exactly what it’s all about, so here are the facts and myths about studying at UQ.

 A full-time course means being at uni from 9am – 5pm five days a week

This is certainly not the case. A standard full-time study load usually consists of eight courses per year – four per semester. Each course is made up of lectures (usually larger classes which cover key content) and tutorials (smaller discussion-based learning which solidifies the material covered in lectures). Generally, each course will require three or four contact hours at uni, with a recommended six to 10 hours of self-directed study in your own time. Depending on your timetable, this could mean, that you are actually only on campus two or three days per week. If your program has a large practical component, which many of the health programs do, these hours could vary.

Your choice of degree is vital for ensuring your future success

Of course, if you are certain about your future outcome then the qualification is essential; however, if you are not sure which career path you are going to go down then this is not as crucial. Pick your program based on what you love. You are going to be living, breathing and probably dreaming about the program you pick – so make sure it ignites your passion. You never know who you are going to talk to, the networks you will make, or which final path you are going to go down, so try not to stress too much about ‘the end goal’ or ‘your future job’ – things have a way of working out the way they are meant to. 

You don’t have to pay your student loan back until you have started working and earning over a certain amount

This is true. Unlike some overseas tertiary education institutions, uni fees at UQ (if you are eligible) are put on hold by the Australian Government (Commonwealth supported) until you have graduated and are earning enough to start paying the fees back. When you start to pay back your loan depends on your income, so the more you earn, the higher your repayment will be. The ATO calculates your compulsory repayment for the year which automatically gets deducted from your pay. 

Moving abroad wipes your student loan

Wouldn’t that be nice! Sorry to disappoint but this one is untrue, otherwise it would leave the country in a right state! The Australian Government has made new changes to ensure that even if you move abroad, you will have the same repayment obligations as those who live in Australia.

Your tutor will check your homework every week to ensure you are on track

Tutors are there to be your guides, not your parents. Nobody will be looking over your shoulder to check that you are doing the right thing (unless it is graded). Uni is all about self-directed learning. This means it is up to you to make sure you are organised, completing readings and homework, and starting your assignments in plenty of time. 

Some students graduate with a straight GPA of 7

That is correct. It is possible to graduate with a straight grade point average (GPA) of 7 (the very highest you can possibly get). Just passing a degree is a tremendous achievement for all graduates, never mind getting a high-distinction in every assignment, exam, oral presentation and essay. 

Uni is all work and no play

This one is certainly not true! Yes, your studies must be taken seriously; however, by organising your time there is plenty of time for a fun-filled social life. UQ supports students participating in social clubs: check out some of UQ’S Weird and Wonderful Clubs and Societies

Uni is all theory and no practice 

Another myth we are very happy to debunk…not true! The health programs in particular have a very high component of practical experiences integrated into all courses. Whether this is through hands-on learning in class or off-campus experiences, we want to ensure all students are putting theory into practice. Fourteen out of our 15 health undergraduate programs require some element of practical placement (sometimes called clinical placement) off-campus during your degree. For example, when studying a Bachelor of Nursing, you must complete 1100 hours of supervised placement during your program, starting from week five.

St Lucia campus is so big it even has its own postcode 

It’s true. With our mini village having everything from a post office, bank, seven libraries, more than 100 buildings, five museums, countless food shops and cafes – postcode 4072 has it all. Look us up

 Uni is really hard!

Completing your degree can be as hard or as easy as you make it. If you leave all your assignments till the night before and use the ‘cram method’ for exams, then sure, you might find it hard. If you organise your time, listen in class, review your notes regularly, complete the recommended readings and prioritise your uni study – then your uni life will be much smoother and you will set yourself up for success.

Getting a job after uni is even harder!

After you complete your degree you will have many options for what to do next. Many of our graduates go on to find full-time employment straight away. In fact, 82 per cent of 2015 Health and Behavioural Sciences graduates, and 94.19 per cent of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences graduates were in full-time work within four months of completing their degree (Graduate Destination Survey, 2015). These graduates had an average starting salary of $55,000 and $67,000 respectively (GDS, 2015). Not bad for first year out of uni! The key to landing your dream job is to really immerse yourself in your chosen industry and to get as much experience as possible. At the end of the day, this is what future employers are looking for and are impressed by. Where you can, try to get an internship, casual job or any type of work in the industry before you graduate. With your wealth of knowledge from uni, real experience, and a killer resume/application, you will be fully prepared for job searching and landing your dream career.

Bush Turkeys rule UQ

We are going to have to leave this myth unanswered, as we are still not sure. Investigations are continuing.
 


 

Last updated:
6 June 2017